Symptoms of the kissing disease-Mononucleosis - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

Mono, or infectious mononucleosis, refers to a group of symptoms usually caused by the Epstein-Barr virus EBV. It typically occurs in teenagers, but you can get it at any age. Many people develop EBV infections as children after age 1. Any child who gets EBV will probably be immune to mono for the rest of their life. For this reason, mono affects mainly high school and college students.

Symptoms of the kissing disease

Symptoms of the kissing disease

Symptoms of the kissing disease

Symptoms of the kissing disease

Some of the causes of swollen lymph nodes include an ear infection…. Because their management is much the same, it is not always helpful, or possible, to distinguish between Epstein—Barr-virus mononucleosis and cytomegalovirus infection. Healthy communities. Show references AskMayoExpert. How is mononucleosis spread? Protecting your health Simple things you can Symptoms of the kissing disease to protect your health and the health of others. Infectious mononucleosis mono is often called the kissing disease. CRC Press.

L ron hubbard gay son. Signs and symptoms

Most people are infected with EBV early in life. Like transmitting the cold virus, though, coughing can also scatter kiesing infection. Almost all adults have been infected with EBV and have built up antibodies to fight the infection. Learn more about the mono symptoms in children. Accessed Aug. If your doctor suspects your toddler has mono, they will probably recommend that you make sure your child gets rest and plenty of fluids. Kising on:. Some links to sexual transmission exist as well, but confirmed cases are relatively rare. Because Symptoms of the kissing disease single cause…. Aronson MD, et al. Use only acetaminophen Tylenol or ibuprofen. Epstein-Barr virus and infectious mononucleosis.

Mononucleosis, also known as "mono," is an infectious disease that is usually caused by the Epstein-Barr virus a herpes virus.

  • While often uncomfortable, extreme cases are very rare.
  • Mono is known to plague us more during our experimental years.
  • Mono, or infectious mononucleosis, refers to a group of symptoms usually caused by the Epstein-Barr virus EBV.
  • Infectious mononucleosis , commonly known as the kissing disease , is an infectious ailment usually caused by the Epstein-Barr virus.
  • Infectious mononucleosis mono is often called the kissing disease.

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Notifiable disease reporting. When and how to notify SA Health of cases including deaths suspected of having or diagnosed with notifiable conditions. Once a person catches Epstein Barr virus, it is believed that the virus remains in his or her body for life, though it usually does not cause further illness. Glandular fever is spread from person-to-person through contact with saliva. Young children may be infected by saliva on the hands of care givers or by sucking and sharing toys, but the virus does not survive very well in the environment.

Kissing results in spread among young adults. Symptoms most often occurs in older children and young adults. When the infection occurs in young children, symptoms are mild or absent. The illness can last between 1 and several weeks and very rarely a chronic form develops.

Illness can be more severe in those who have lowered immunity and in some ethnic groups serious complications may occur many years after the initial infection. Not accurately known. The virus is shed in the saliva for up to a year after illness and intermittently thereafter. Medication for control of fever may be required.

Aspirin should not be given to children under 12 years of age unless specifically recommended by a doctor. Contact sports and heavy lifting should be avoided for the first month after illness because of risk of damage to the spleen, which often is enlarged during acute infection. What are you looking for? Close Healthy living for you and your family How to make healthy choices a part of every day life.

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How glandular fever is spread Glandular fever is spread from person-to-person through contact with saliva. Signs and symptoms Symptoms of glandular fever include: fever sore throat swollen glands abdominal pain and jaundice yellowing of skin and eyes occur less frequently.

Diagnosis Diagnosis is made by a blood test. Incubation period time between becoming infected and developing symptoms 4 to 6 weeks. Infectious period time during which an infected person can infect others Not accurately known.

Treatment Seek medical advice if difficulty with swallowing or abdominal pain occurs. There is no effective antiviral drug available.

Most patients with glandular fever recover uneventfully. Prevention Exclusion from childcare, preschool, school and work is not necessary there is no vaccine available to prevent Epstein Barr virus infection follow good hand washing techniques minimise contact with saliva avoid sharing cups and glasses. Useful links Hand hygiene. Related information You've got what? Recommended health checks Protecting your health Healthy weight Healthy eating Be active Be involved in your own health care Healthy mind Healthy Sleep Healthy communities Top tips for healthy living Healthy living resources Winter wellness Health topics Health topics A - Z Health topics by body part Health conditions, prevention and treatment Going to hospital?

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Sometimes your doctor will request a complete blood count. She also recommends gargling with warm salt water a few times each day to help soothe a sore throat. Older adults with mono will usually have a fever but may not have other symptoms such as a sore throat, swollen lymph nodes, or an enlarged spleen. The route of transmission is through saliva and this is spread through kissing an infected person or drinking from the same bottle or the same glass as them, eating from the same plate, biting the same food, etc. Read this next. You're most likely to get mononucleosis with all the signs and symptoms if you're an adolescent or young adult.

Symptoms of the kissing disease

Symptoms of the kissing disease

Symptoms of the kissing disease. Causes of kissing disease

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Mononucleosis (Mono) | Cleveland Clinic

Mononucleosis mono is a group of symptoms usually caused by a virus. In teens it can cause flu-like symptoms such as:. Infectious mononucleosis pronounced: mah-no-noo-klee-OH-sus , often called "mono" or "the kissing disease," is an infection usually caused by the Epstein-Barr virus EBV. EBV is very common, and many people are exposed to the virus at some time in childhood.

Not everyone who is exposed to EBV develops mono, though. As with many viruses, it is possible to be exposed to and infected with EBV without becoming sick. People who have been infected with EBV will carry the virus for the rest of their lives — even if they never have any signs or symptoms of mono.

People who do show symptoms of having mono probably will not get sick or have symptoms again. Although EBV is the most common cause of mono, other viruses, such as cytomegalovirus pronounced: sye-toe-meh-guh-low-VYE-rus , can cause a similar illness. Like EBV, cytomegalovirus stays in the body for life and may not cause any symptoms. But what if you haven't kissed anyone?

Researchers believe that mono may be passed sexually as well. Experts think people with mono are most contagious from the time they first get infected and then for the first 18 months after getting mono. But, because EBV stays in the body for life, the virus can show up in a person's saliva from time to time, and there's a chance that person may be contagious during these times, even if he or she feels OK. Symptoms usually begin to appear about 4 to 7 weeks after infection with the virus.

Signs that you may have mono include:. People who have mono may have different combinations of these symptoms, and some may have symptoms so mild that they hardly notice them. Some people who get infected with EBV might not have any symptoms. To diagnose mono, the doctor may do a blood test and an exam to check for things like swollen tonsils and an enlarged liver or spleen, which often is a sign of the infection.

There is no cure for mononucleosis. Mono needs to run its course naturally. So the best treatment for mono is plenty of rest, especially early in the illness when symptoms are the most severe. Symptoms may last 2 to 4 weeks, and some people feel tired for several weeks longer. That's why it's important to take care of yourself and get lots of rest.

For fever and aching muscles, try taking acetaminophen or ibuprofen. Don't take aspirin unless your doctor tells you to: Aspirin has been linked to a serious disease in kids and teens called Reye syndrome, which can lead to liver failure and death. Because mono is caused by a virus, antibiotics such as penicillin won't help unless you have an additional infection like strep throat.

In fact, some antibiotics can even cause a rash if you take them while you have mono. Although there's no magic pill for mono, you can do some things to feel better.

The best treatment is to get plenty of rest, especially during the beginning stages of the illness when your symptoms are the worst. When you start feeling better, take it slow and don't overdo it. Although you can return to school once your fever disappears, you may still feel tired.

Your body will tell you when it's time to rest — listen to it. By taking good care of yourself and resting as much as you need to, you will soon be back to normal, usually within a few weeks. Doctors recommend avoiding sports and activity for at least a month after someone has mono. That's because the spleen is often enlarged temporarily and can burst easily, causing internal bleeding and belly pain. If this happens, you'll need emergency surgery.

Skip vigorous activities, contact sports, cheerleading, weightlifting, or even wrestling with your little siblings or your friends until your doctor gives you the OK. As you recover, make sure you don't share the virus with your friends and family. Wash your hands often, sneeze or cough into a tissue or your elbow not your hands , and keep your drinks and eating utensils to yourself.

This is one time when your friends and family will thank you for being selfish. Larger text size Large text size Regular text size.

Symptoms of the kissing disease