Beaver pond trout fishing-Beautiful brook trout from a beaver pond in Colorado | Fly fishing | Fly fishing, Trout, Fish

I love fishing beaver ponds. My first-ever brook trout was pulled from the bottom of a high-country beaver pond with my grandfather standing watch over my shoulder, many, many years ago. In the video above, I talk about approaching a beaver pond with the right amount of stealth, the right casts to structure and even the sometimes-necessary action a dry fly needs to get the little denizens of backed-up dams to come to the top. Fly fishing beaver ponds is one of the many joys that come with chasing trout in small water. Instead, put yourself in the best position to cast over pond without disturbing the water or the fish it holds.

Beaver pond trout fishing

Beaver pond trout fishing

Beaver pond trout fishing

Because beaver ponds are fed by an incoming water source, and drain into the creek below the pond, they have escape routes for fish to leave the pond to breed. But there are plenty Beaver pond trout fishing other reasons. NYOB brook provides an excellent example of what I believe makes for a great brook-trout beaver pond. Moreover, they stabilize high-water events and can provide fishing opportunity when the rivers are in spate. Contact Us. Beaver pond trout fishing dark, rain-swollen skies, they glisten like obsidian; during rare moments of sunlight, their acid-stained waters light up with the color of strong, bitter ale. Join Our Mailing List. Third, the beaver pond on NYOB creek is, relatively speaking, rather young. The Stowe Reporter's weekly newsletter delivers the latest headlines, upcoming events and local information from Stowe, Waterbury, Morrisville and all of Lamoille County to your inbox — straight from the newsroom! Maybe you'd have caught fish and maybe not, but you'd be absolutely certain of one thing: You had really been fishing.

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With that said, I will state that beaver ponds can support some of the finest wild and native brook-trout fishing Vermont has to offer. Flies The 15 Best Carp Flies Jay Zimmerman - September 27, As you explore your home water, keep in mind what they are are eating to select the best carp You can Latin name gray squirrel tie a black carey with black dubbing and dyed black Chinese pheasant rump or a self-body Carey with a wound natural brown-green Chinese pheasant feather for the body and another Chinese pheasant feather wound as hackle. Most Popular. Tom Carey who Beaver pond trout fishing the pattern. One old bear would lean against a favorite rock and a few minutes later say "come over here ,I have trout in here with me". I would Beaver pond trout fishing like my favorite spots to be posted on the internet. I started fishing beaver ponds when I was young and still learning Wine bar long beach gay to cast. Latest Review. They were trapped throughout the Rockies, nearly to extinction. Get out there and get teased by trout,while trying to tease them. Carey Specials for lake and beaver pond fishing. Dear Chad. Perfectly at home in these cluttered, hard-to-reach waters, the cutthroat prowls narrow passageways between flooded thickets in search of damselfly nymphs or hatching mayflies in the spring, then rises to capture flying termites, craneflies, or almost anything else in the fall.

I started fishing beaver ponds when I was young and still learning how to cast.

  • Beaver ponds are an acquired taste.
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I started fishing beaver ponds when I was young and still learning how to cast. Most of the ponds I fished were well beyond the nearest road and it took quite a hike to reach them, so there was never anyone else around to witness my casting ineptitude. To my way of thinking, that made them good places to practice. It was on such a pond that I saw a big trout rise and tried to cover it with my first double-haul. I tugged violently, line flew in all directions, and the 16 dry fly ended up deep inside my right nostril.

But that's another story. I now realize that beaver ponds are not the best places to practice casting. Most are so full of standing snags and other obstructions they can cause trouble even for expert casters. But they were good places to learn to fish. Small and shallow, they were inhabited by wary trout that demanded a quiet approach and a careful presentation.

Either you learned these things or you didn't catch fish. Those wary, demanding trout are one reason I still enjoy fishing beaver ponds. But there are plenty of other reasons. In my backyard, on the wet side of the Pacific Northwest, beaver ponds have their own peculiar haunting beauty.

Under dark, rain-swollen skies, they glisten like obsidian; during rare moments of sunlight, their acid-stained waters light up with the color of strong, bitter ale. They exude a scent of mustiness and decay that's perfectly in character with their gloomy aspect. Skeletons of drowned fir, cedar, and hemlock rise from their muddy bottoms like dark stalagmites, gesturing wildly with spectral, moss-draped limbs. Great blue herons stalk these waters, ospreys nest in their tallest snags, and swallows and bats come to feed on their hatching insects.

So do trout. Some ponds hold rainbow or transplanted Eastern brook trout, though their bright spots and speckles are usually sullen and subdued in the dark beaver-pond water. In the fall, a few ponds hold coho salmon, resting briefly from the rigors of their upstream spawning journey. But the most familiar inhabitant of Northwest beaver ponds, the fish for which such places seem especially to have been made, is the cutthroat. Perfectly at home in these cluttered, hard-to-reach waters, the cutthroat prowls narrow passageways between flooded thickets in search of damselfly nymphs or hatching mayflies in the spring, then rises to capture flying termites, craneflies, or almost anything else in the fall.

Even in dark water, these fish are neon bolts of olive, silver, black, and crimson, glowing as if from some mysterious inner source of light. Beaver-pond cutthroat always look happy to be where they are. Fishing in these ponds can be wildly unpredictable from one season to the next. Sometimes you go back to a favorite pond and find it isn't even there anymore; the beaver have been trapped out or they fled, their untended dam has washed away, and what was a pond last season has this year become a meadow.

Even if the pond is still there, the fishing will depend on whether the season has been merely wet or even wetter than usual, whether the beaver have faithfully tended their structures, or whether the trout have been successful in their spawning.

Sometimes you will find a pond that holds many small trout and the fishing will be fast and easy. Occasionally you will find one with no fish at all and end up wondering why you spent the time and effort to make the long hike in.

Once in a while — just often enough to make it worthwhile — you'll come across a pond that holds a few large old trout, perhaps the last survivors of a population trapped when beavers built the dam to make the pond.

These places can present the best fishing of all, but it can be maddeningly fascinating and maddeningly frustrating by turns, sometimes both on the same day. Conveniences like float tubes had yet to be invented when I started fishing beaver ponds. We used inflatable rubber rafts instead — "two-man" rafts, they were called, although the two men would have to be very small and need to know one another very well to occupy one of them without disaster. Even with only a single passenger, the rafts weren't very maneuverable, and in the snag-filled waters of beaver ponds you had to be wary of splinters lying just beneath the surface.

If you hit one, it could result in a ruptured air chamber and you'd suddenly be left clinging to only half a raft. The rafts weren't very comfortable, either, because if it rained — as it nearly always did — the rainwater would collect inside the raft and it would fill up like a floating bathtub, leaving you nearly as wet as if you'd fallen in. It was a peculiarly masochistic kind of fishing.

At the end of a day you'd have lost at least a half-dozen flies and tippets to the ubiquitous snags and you'd be wet, weary, and covered with mosquito bites. Maybe you'd have caught fish and maybe not, but you'd be absolutely certain of one thing: You had really been fishing. None of this wimpy stuff with guides manning the oars, and chilled bottles of wine and grilled lamb at streamside; we're talking tough, do-it-yourself, hairy-chested fishing.

That's what it takes to join the brotherhood of beaver-pond anglers. A few beaver ponds reach the status of major impoundments. In one of my favorites, many generations of beaver have worked to construct a long, serpentine dam across a shallow basin, backing up enough water to flood 25 acres or more. Despite its size, the pond is only about four feet deep and choked with waterlogged brush, fallen timber, and standing snags.

Wreathed in morning mist, it's a ghostly, mysterious place, a good spot for a Halloween party any day of the year. But I love it. It holds just a few fish, mostly cutthroat and a few rainbows, all big and extremely shy. On a good day I might hook one or two of them and leave several flies hanging from the surrounding snags.

But a inch cutthroat captured from such water, admired briefly, and then carefully returned, is a memory ever to be savored. Of course the Pacific Northwest has no monopoly on beaver ponds. They can be found wherever there is cold, running water, lots of trees, and a population of eager beaver.

I imagine they all offer similar fishing. But beaver ponds have not fared well in the face of metastasizing suburbs; many have been drained, bulldozed, filled in, or artificially landscaped to provide centerpieces for tasteless "developments.

So there aren't as many beaver ponds as there used to be. But there still are some good ones left — dark little jewels of water hidden back in the woods, filled with dark little jewels of trout.

If you make the effort to find them and fish them, I promise you won't be disappointed. Well, not all the time, anyway. Sign Me Up. Bahamas - Bonefish Conway casts for his personal best bonefish while fishing the Grand Bahama islands. Here's the top

Wading a small creek has an effect. Search Media New Media. Most are so full of standing snags and other obstructions they can cause trouble even for expert casters. Even if the pond is still there, the fishing will depend on whether the season has been merely wet or even wetter than usual, whether the beaver have faithfully tended their structures, or whether the trout have been successful in their spawning. They get their name from the dark red slash under their jaws. It was on such a pond that I saw a big trout rise and tried to cover it with my first double-haul.

Beaver pond trout fishing

Beaver pond trout fishing

Beaver pond trout fishing

Beaver pond trout fishing

Beaver pond trout fishing. Fly Fisherman

Watershed people. Fly fishing a beaver pond photo: Chris Hunt. A beaver swimming photo: Tatiana Bulyonkova. Backcountry Fly Fishing. Unpacking is where it's at. More Blog Posts. Giving away fly rods. Dear Chad. From the Archives. For the classics. Anglers everywhere need to stand up for restored protections to America's rivers and streams. Latest Photography. Images: Dan Zazworsky. More Photography. More of Pennsylvania's Small Freestoners.

Latest Travel. More Travel. Throw out the playbook. For dry-fly creek freaks, it's the best time of the year. The Crow Rock years. Beasts in the northern kingdom. Latest Conservation. Up in smoke. More Conservation. Trump admin finalizes repeal of Clean Water Rule. Alaska's Tongass is in peril again. Help protect Bahamas bonefish by supporting two new national parks.

What about the others? Latest Review. Review: Orvis PRO waders. More Reviews. Review: Patagonia Tough Puff Hoody. Latest Tip. Prospecting South of Old Faithful, a tiny stream runs beneath the Grand Loop Road—thousands of tourists drive over the little bridge every single summer day.

A trail generally More Tips. How to fish the carp spawn. The key to becoming a better fly angler. Drift boats. Little slip bobbers will keep you out of most of brush. Crawlers or small minnows. Beaver ponds are usually best early or real late because the water warms, but may have a chance this year. Sent from my XT using Tapatalk.

Jmohunts , Apr 26, Apr 26, 3. Messages: 3, Likes Received: 3, I still want to know why we can't talk more specifically about rivers on this site, even locations who cares were just people fishing trying to share information, over half of us fishing rivers in the U P don't live there and we don't have a clue where to start but there's some big secret about talking about where you're going to fish at I just don't get it!?

Apr 26, 4. Apr 26, 5. All the ones I used to fish were quite old, but loaded with leeches. Shoeman , Apr 26, Apr 26, 6. Messages: 10 Likes Received: 8. ShoreFisher , Apr 26, Apr 26, 7.

Yes, I'm a panfisherman boat converting to a river and stream fisher. There is a Major UP river close to my property I would be inquiring about, don't know where or how to start so I'd love to get advice!

Small streams don't require any advice, you just go get your spinner stuck in brush until you can hit your spot and reel like hell or float a crawler and look for deep dark holes with some structure? Are we allowed to ask generic questions about how to fish a bigger river in the UP and what fish aside from Brook and Brown trout may be in it? It's a long ways inland from lake Michigan, like 40 miles from lake Michigan if I'm allowed to say that?

Never fished a beaver pond but it sounds interesting! Apr 26, 8. Messages: 2, Likes Received: 2, Location: Westland. Aaronjeep2 , Apr 26, Apr 26, 9. We were driving around one day with my father-in-law and BIL, trying to find an old Deer Camp he hadn't been to in years, got lost so they parked the truck and decided to go in and deer hunt. The road was flooded out because of a big beautiful Beaver Dam, I have not been there in over 25 years.

I would love to go back and fish it, I never even thought about it, I thought it was too shallow to fish, but I never really paid attention because I didn't have waders so we just avoided it to stay dry! Man it really makes me want to see it again, I don't know about you guys, but there's several places that I've been to in the U P, only one or two times that stick in my mind, and I want to go back and see them and I know several of them I never will! I have really enjoyed my travels all over the upper peninsula, what a wonderful rugged land such remote Beauty!

PerchPatrol , zzcop , slowpaya and 1 other person like this. Apr 26, Waif , Apr 26, Yeah but I've just named the stream or a river without even talking about a particular location and Got a warning or a guy like you getting all paranoid I think it's ridiculous, so I'd have to say I disagree with you, if you started naming specifics like Downstream of or by a certain Road but we're talking about so much territory here again it's ridiculous and I disagree with your statement, most of us are just looking for general information and want to talk about the general area that we want to fish what kind of fish are in there!

I understand that there is not going to be a flood of people coming to fish a small creek, but people still don't want more people at their fishing spots especially those who just read something and didn't do the work to find the spot. Some of my favorite spots on streams I've never seen another person fishing and I like it that way. Word gets out, although usually on larger places, and next thing you know there are several people there.

It really only takes a few people to visit a spot to lessen the magic of the place. I would not like my favorite spots to be posted on the internet. So if I've got a small stream on my property, And I don't want to put waders on what am I looking for a deep hole and what are the chances that I could put a bench up in that spot and sneak up to it and consistently catch trout or do you have to move around. Can you fish trout successfully from the bank or do you need to have waders and get right in the small stream?

I'd put you on the creek I mentioned. And give you all I knew about how to score on it. I no longer fish it after 20 years of it being part of a run of multiple locales.

I love fishing beaver ponds. My first-ever brook trout was pulled from the bottom of a high-country beaver pond with my grandfather standing watch over my shoulder, many, many years ago. In the video above, I talk about approaching a beaver pond with the right amount of stealth, the right casts to structure and even the sometimes-necessary action a dry fly needs to get the little denizens of backed-up dams to come to the top.

Fly fishing beaver ponds is one of the many joys that come with chasing trout in small water. Instead, put yourself in the best position to cast over pond without disturbing the water or the fish it holds. Sixty winners in all!

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Beaver pond trout fishing

Beaver pond trout fishing